Monthly Archives: October 2015

3D Touch on the iPhone 6s

One of the new features of the iPhone 6s is 3D Touch, a new technology that enables the device to not only detect traditional swipes and taps, but also presses into the screen.

The iPhone 6s can not only detect a forceful push on the display – it can also determine how hard you’re pushing it. That’s why Apple have called it 3D Touch – it takes interaction with our mobile devices quite literally into a new dimension.

The best way to demonstrate this new innovation is to show it in action, so please watch my latest video (above) to see it in action!

When I first heard about 3D Touch I thought it might be a bit of a gimmick, however I’m already finding that I use it every day – it really is rather useful.

This is only the beginning, as developers come up with ingenious ways to act on pushes “into” the screen we’ll no doubt begin to see all sorts of interesting new uses for this technology.

If you liked it, please give the video a thumbs up on YouTube and if you enjoyed the content, please subscribe to my channel where you can find lots more!

Comparing the iPhone 4, iPhone 5s and iPhone 6s Plus

Here’s a new video on my new YouTube channel I’ve started up to support my blog. There’s not much to write about as it’s all in the visuals!

The video compares and contrasts three iPhones: the iPhone 4 (released in June 2010), the iPhone 5s (released in September 2013) and finally the newest of the iPhones the 6s Plus released last month.

I think it’s interesting to compare the products’ specs. There’s not much hands-on apart from a quick comparison of how Touch ID has been improved on the 6s.

I talk briefly about 3D touch but think I incorrectly call it Force Touch, so I apologise for that!

I hope you enjoy the video. Please give it a thumbs up on YouTube and if you enjoyed the content please subscribe to my channel to be notified of new videos.

Adding a monitor arm to my desk setup

This week I added a new monitor arm to my desk setup. In this blog (and accompanying video) I describe why I chose the particular arm I went for and how I found using it since installing.

I’ve had a computer for years. So I’ve had different monitors for years too. I’ve never had an all-in-one (like an iMac) instead preferring to add a screen of my choice to a headless computer. The advantage of this approach to owning a computer is that you can change your display without having to change the entire hardware.

When I bought my cylindrical “trash can” Mac Pro in December 2013 (finally received in February 2014 as regular readers will know all about!) I knew that during the lifetime of the machine I would want to add a retina display. The prices and specs at that time were not good so I left it until July 2015 before purchasing an LG 31MU97 true 4K (and therefore “retina” display). It’s fantastic!

One of the criteria for my new screen was that it should include a VESA mount. As I said, I’ve owned different monitors over the years but none of them have ever had a VESA mount and I liked the idea of having that flexibility in my locker should I need it.

The stand that comes with the LG is not bad, as stands go, but for me (as I demonstrate in my video) the height adjustment isn’t quite enough, especially as in an ideal world I would have the screen at slightly different heights depending on if my desk is in a “sit” or “stand” position (I have a video coming up soon showing the sit/stand desk if you’re interested in one of those). Replacing the supplied stand with a new VESA based alternative seemed the appropriate solution.

What to get?!
Then the problems (and the research) start. Should I get an arm or a new stand? Should I get a mount capable of adding additional arms should I decide to get another screen? What manufacturer should I go for? Duronic? Ergotron, perhaps?

I spent quite a bit of time looking around at articles on the intertubes and videos on “the YouTubes” as well as looking at manufacturer’s own web sites and information.

It makes your head spin!?

I eventually stumbled upon a company called Chief based in the United States. I’d never heard of them, however their arms seem well constructed and, crucially, have a rather nifty cable management solution built in – most of the competition use standard clips similar to those found on normal stands.

I selected an arm called a “Kontour” (yes, with a “K”)  that I thought would work well for me. My computer and monitor are black so I rather fancied having the black version of the arm, however it’s not for sale in the UK unless you want to pay a hefty surcharge to have it imported from the US. So I went with the silver version instead at half the price.

Delivery and Installation
I bought it through a reseller that will remain nameless on this blog, however I won’t be using them again – the packaging was simply awful and I was very worried that the goods would be damaged too. However, Chief clearly build solid products so while the box had barely survived the journey, the arm seemed OK. A small scratch, but nothing functionally out of place.

In my video you can see part of the installation. Unfortunately both of my camera batteries were nearly out of juice so I couldn’t record the entire process, however hopefully you can see what I started with and how it ended up.

Final thoughts
The arm itself is of solid construction. It’s well built and the cable management is very nice. As you will see from my video, the spaghetti of cables you could see beforehand has gone and I now have a nice clear desk. I can even position my laptop below my LG should I need to. There was initially a small amount of wobble from the screen, however this was more to do with my desk and some tightening of bolts (on both the arm and the desk) virtually removed this annoyance. It’s certainly not a big problem or one I’m going to remain concerned about.

For the record, the arm I went for was the K1D120S. I would’ve preferred the K1D120B which is the black version, but not at twice the price. I can only comment on what I’ve used and having never come into contact with an arm by anyone else I can’t say whether  this one is better or worse than alternatives, however I’m pleased with what I’ve bought and it makes a nice addition to my 2015 desk setup.